WHEN IS MOTHER’S DAY AND WHY DO WE CELEBRATE

A mother is the best friend and supporter anyone can have. They've always had our backs, from raising us as children to staying with us as cranky teenagers and providing the occasional shoulder to cry on. Every year, nations all throughout the world celebrate Mother's Day — a day devoted to all moms on which we may express our respect. It is celebrated on the second Sunday of May, which this year occurs on May 8.


History of Mother’s Day

The ancient Greeks and Romans conducted celebrations in honor of the mother goddesses Rhea and Cybele, but the clearest modern predecessor for Mother's Day is the early Christian holiday known as "Mothering Sunday." Mothering Sunday has been a part of the Christian calendar in the United Kingdom since at least the 16th century. According to research of Mother's Day ceremonies, it is presently observed in over 152 countries throughout the world. Mother's Day ceremonies decreased in popularity in the 1900s, but were revived in the twentieth century by the efforts of an American lady called Anna Jarvis. Mother's Day became an official American holiday in 1914 as a consequence of Jarvis' lobbying of President Woodrow Wilson.

Mother’s Day around the world

Many of these ceremonies, including those in Australia, Brazil, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Fiji, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Taiwan, and Venezuela, take place on the same day as the US event. These nations have comparable customs of celebrating mothers with store-bought and homemade presents, flowers, and food. There are certain countries that do things a little differently than others. Mother's Day is celebrated in several Middle Eastern nations, including Egypt, Iran, Iraq, and Bahrain, on March 21, the spring equinox. The event was created by the Egyptians to commemorate Isis, the goddess who is regarded as the ideal of motherhood. Today, Egyptian youngsters write thank-you cards to their mothers and complete all domestic duties on the same day. Mother's Day is honored in Hungary on the first Sunday of May. Young children create handcrafted cards and gifts for their mothers. In Hungary, lilacs are the traditional flower of Mother's Day, and several bouquets are distributed.


All traditions, however, do share characteristics and ultimately honor mothers and women who have brought peace and improvement to the world. Despite consumerism gradually overpowering authenticity, the day will forever serve as a reminder of what mothers do for us. If you’re looking for a unique present, you might want to take a look through Afcultures.com. Our website has thousands of customized products that will interest you. Feel free to tell us your wonderful idea and our job is finish it in a perfect way.